Tiotropium Pharmacology

On this episode, I discuss tiotropium pharmacology. In addition, I cover adverse effects, administration pearls, and drug interactions.

Tiotropium blocks acetylcholine from binding the M3 receptor in the lungs. This leads to a relaxation of the bronchial smooth muscle.

Because tiotropium has anticholinergic activity, there is a potential for anticholinergic adverse effects like constipation, urinary retention, and dry mouth.

The tiotropium Handihaler can be confusing to patients. I discuss medication misadventures in this podcast episode.

I discuss important drug interactions on the podcast, be sure to check out my latest project which is a 200+ page book on managing drug interactions in primary care.

Be sure to check out our free Top 200 study guide – a 31 page PDF that is yours for FREE!

Varenicline Pharmacology

Varenicline is a partial nicotine agonist that can be used to help patients quit smoking.

The two most common adverse effects that I have seen in clinical practice with varenicline are GI upset and insomnia/vivid dreams.

GI upset with varenicline can be reduced by giving the drug with food and a full glass of water. A dose reduction may also be considered.

Patients should identify a goal stop date for smoking cessation prior to begininng the use of varenicline.

I discuss important drug interactions on the podcast, be sure to check out my latest project which is a 200+ page book on managing drug interactions in primary care.

Be sure to check out our free Top 200 study guide – a 31 page PDF that is yours for FREE!

Fluticasone, Umeclidinium, and Vilanterol Pharmacology

Fluticasone, Umeclidinium, and Vilanterol is a combination medication used in the setting of COPD. I discuss the pharmacology of this agent further in this episode.

Fluticasone is the inhaled corticosteroid portion of the drug while umeclidinium is a LAMA and vilanterol is a LABA medication.

Drug interactions aren’t incredibly common or strongly clinically significant, but I discuss some of them with Trelegy Ellipta.

Having a once-daily dose can be advantageous to help improve patient adherence. Fluticasone, umeclidinium, and vilanterol comes as a once-daily combination.

I discuss important drug interactions on the podcast, be sure to check out my latest project which is a 200+ page book on managing drug interactions in primary care.

Be sure to check out our free Top 200 study guide – a 31 page PDF that is yours for FREE!

Nicotine Patch Pharmacology

Nicotine replacement therapy is an important tool in helping our patients quit smoking. There are lots of clinical pearls involving the pharmacology of nicotine patches and I explore them in this episode.

Nicotine patches differ from the gum and other acute relief forms in that they are intended to provide a consistent level of nicotine in the body.

The initial dosing of nicotine patches is dependent upon the number of cigarettes smoked by the patient. I discuss it further in the podcast.

When applying nicotine patches, it is important to remember to utilize a clean, non-hairy area to ensure the patch adheres to the skin appropriately.

I discuss important drug interactions on the podcast, be sure to check out my latest project which is a 200+ page book on managing drug interactions in primary care.

Be sure to check out our free Top 200 study guide – a 31 page PDF that is yours for FREE!

Short Acting Beta Agonists RLP Episode 023

On this episode we are going to break down the pharmacology of albuterol and levalbuterol.  Other items addressed;

  • Difference between beta-agonists and beta-blockers
  • Rule of 2
  • Administration pearls and clinical practice problems

Enjoy the episode and share it with your friends if you are benefitting from it!