Scopolamine Pharmacology

In this episode of the RLP podcast, I discuss scopolamine pharmacology.

Scopolamine patches can be used in the management of motion sickness and surgery/anesthesia induced nausea and vomiting.

Transdermal scopolamine has a slow onset of action so we need to be deliberate about the timing of placement (usually 4-6 hours prior to anticipated time of symptoms).

Transdermal scopolamine is highly anticholinergic and can cause dry eyes, dry mouth, urinary retention, and confusion.

I discuss important drug interactions on the podcast, be sure to check out my latest project which is a 200+ page book on managing drug interactions in primary care.

Be sure to check out our free Top 200 study guide – a 31 page PDF that is yours for FREE!

Tamsulosin Pharmacology

On this episode of the RLP podcast, I discuss tamsulosin pharmacology.

Tamsulosin inhibits alpha receptors which helps improve urine flow in patients with BPH.

As an off-label use, you may see tamsulosin used to try to aid in the passage of renal stones.

Tamsulosin concentrations may be increased by CYP3A4 inhibitors and reduced by CYP3A4 inducers.

I discuss important drug interactions on the podcast, be sure to check out my latest project which is a 200+ page book on managing drug interactions in primary care.

Be sure to check out our free Top 200 study guide – a 31 page PDF that is yours for FREE!

Finasteride Pharmacology

On this episode of the RLP podcast, I discuss finasteride pharmacology.

Finasteride can be used in the management of BPH or male pattern baldness.

By reducing overall androgen burden, finasteride can help to shrink the prostate and improve BPH symptoms.

Finasteride takes a long time to work, so this is an important education point for patients.

I discuss important drug interactions on the podcast, be sure to check out my latest project which is a 200+ page book on managing drug interactions in primary care.

Be sure to check out our free Top 200 study guide – a 31 page PDF that is yours for FREE!

Lamotrigine Pharmacology

On this episode of the Real Life Pharmacology podcast, I discuss the ins and outs of lamotrigine pharmacology.

Lamotrigine has a very slow dose titration schedule due to the risk of drug induced rash.

Sedation, GI upset, and CNS changes are the most common adverse effects associated with lamotrigine.

Lamotrigine concentrations can be increased by valproic acid, so we tend to use lower starting doses.

Phenytoin and carbamazepine can lower concentrations of lamotrigine.

I discuss important drug interactions on the podcast, be sure to check out my latest project which is a 200+ page book on managing drug interactions in primary care.

Be sure to check out our free Top 200 study guide – a 31 page PDF that is yours for FREE!

Propofol Pharmacology

On this episode of the Real Life Pharmacology podcast, I breakdown propofol pharmacology.

Propofol is a CNS depressant that is used for general anesthesia.

I discuss propofol infusion syndrome in this episode and what to look out for clinically.

Adding a benzodiazepine or opioid to propofol may have a synergistic effect and the propofol dose may need to be reduced.

I discuss important drug interactions on the podcast, be sure to check out my latest project which is a 200+ page book on managing drug interactions in primary care.

Be sure to check out our free Top 200 study guide – a 31 page PDF that is yours for FREE!

Glucagon Pharmacology

On this episode of the RLP podcast, I discuss glucagon pharmacology.

It is important to remember with glucagon that patients will still require glucose following administration to improve their blood sugar numbers.

Glucagon is typically reserved for moderate to severe episodes of hypoglycemia when patients have altered consciousness.

The major adverse effect with glucagon is nausea and vomiting which often may prevent oral intake of glucose for some time after administration.

I discuss important drug interactions on the podcast, be sure to check out my latest project which is a 200+ page book on managing drug interactions in primary care.

Be sure to check out our free Top 200 study guide – a 31 page PDF that is yours for FREE!

Dulaglutide Pharmacology

Dulaglutide is a GLP-1 agonist used in the management of diabetes.

Dulaglutide has 4 different dosages that can be used to help lower A1C. As the dose goes up, so does the potential for adverse effects however.

Like most of the GLP-1 agonists, dulaglutide is only available as an injection. Semaglutide is an exception to this.

Nausea is the primary adverse effect of dulaglutide which some patients may get used to over time.

I discuss important drug interactions on the podcast, be sure to check out my latest project which is a 200+ page book on managing drug interactions in primary care.

Dapagliflozin Pharmacology

Dapagliflozin is an SGLT-2 Inhibitor that reduces blood sugar by increasing the excretion of sugar through the urine.

Genital and urinary infections is a potential risk with the use of SGLT2 Inhibitors like dapagliflozin.

Dapagliflozin has received FDA approval for use in heart failure (in patients even without diabetes).

Be aware of agents that may enhance the risk for hypoglycemia such an insulin and sulfonylureas.

I discuss important drug interactions on the podcast, be sure to check out my latest project which is a 200+ page book on managing drug interactions in primary care.

Be sure to check out our free Top 200 study guide – a 31 page PDF that is yours for FREE!

Omeprazole Pharmacology

Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor that can be commonly used for GERD, PUD, and GI prophylaxis.

Omeprazole can inhibit CYP2C19 which can cause concentrations of drugs like escitalopram and citalopram to rise.

Hypomagnesemia, low B12, osteoporosis, and an increase in C. Diff risk are potential complications with longer term PPI use.

PPI’s like omeprazole are best given 30-60 minutes before meals. This is something that patients often forget.

I discuss important drug interactions on the podcast, be sure to check out my latest project which is a 200+ page book on managing drug interactions in primary care.

Be sure to check out our free Top 200 study guide – a 31 page PDF that is yours for FREE!

Conjugated Estrogens Pharmacology

Conjugated estrogens (Premarin) are most often used in the management of menopausal symptoms.

Estrogen therapy can increase the risk for breast cancer and the risk should be assessed before beginning therapy.

Blood clots are a potential consequence from the use of Premarin. Premarin can oppose the benefit of anticoagulation.

Conjugated estrogens are broken down by CYP3A4. Inhibitors may increase concentrations while inducers may reduce concentrations.

I discuss important drug interactions on the podcast, be sure to check out my latest project which is a 200+ page book on managing drug interactions in primary care.

Be sure to check out our free Top 200 study guide – a 31 page PDF that is yours for FREE!